Gwydyr Rd, Crieff, UK, PH7 4BS

CAP ~ Crieff Aid Projects

December 13th, 2017: For the latest on the CAP projects see the CAP blog...

From our beginnings in June 2006 CAP has distributed nearly £150,000 to the good causes listed below.

Contents: The Projects:

What is CAP?

The CAP fund was set up by the Crieff Adventist Church to enable us to adopt aid projects and do something practical about the plight of others. We may be only a small church (some 60+ members) but that doesn't get us off the hook. So, applying the principle of 'Put up or shut up', this fund was set up in 2006. We're not big, we're not clever but we also can't ignore the words of Christ in Matthew 25:31-45. Go and look it up...

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Giving to CAP

The CAP fund forms part of the Crieff Adventist Church funds and is administered by the Church Board taking advice from committee of knowledgeable individuals (Crieff church has quite a few members with extensive experience of foreign aid work). Contributions to CAP are run through Church funds - the Adventist Church is a registered charity - thus allowing us to take advantage of Gift Aid.

The projects are selected by a Church Business Meeting every April.

The big small print:

All the money (we repeat ALL THE MONEY) contributed to CAP goes to the projects. We do not have any overheads whatsoever.

If you'd like to help us please contact us at cap@crieffadventist.org.uk.

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The Projects

2015 projects

As voted at the 2015 CAP Business Meeting on 8th May.

Details

Amount GBP

Burkina Faso

A project run in conjunction with ADRA UK and a major commitment for CAP. The proposal is to fund for 3 years (2013-2015 inclusive) at £5000 pa. 2015 will be the last of the three years.

See '2013', below for details.

Reports:

£5,000
Philippines Angeles City project

For some years we have worked with Dave Caukill of ICC Australia. Last year we helped with a new venture that ICC Australia were starting - the 'Blessed Home' project in Angeles City, Philippines. We propose extending this funding for another year.

See '2014', below for details.

Reports:

£3,000
Scotland, Perth Perthshire Women's Aid (PWA)

PWA is a branch of Scottish Women’s Aid which provides practical assistance to victims of domestic abuse. PWA is a charity and receives some government grants to cover staff costs. Money for direct 'hands-on' aid to the women and children comes from donations such as this proposed CAP grant. PWA do not have a specific single project in mind. Our money would instead be spent on direct help, for example: clothing, food, basics needed for accommodation, translators for overseas clients and other necessities.

This will be the fourth year that CAP has made contributions to the work of PWA.

£2,500
Laos Xieng Khouang Language School

The Xieng Kouang Province lies in the north-east of Laos and borders Vietnam. During the Vietnam War that ended in 1975, the whole area was completely flattened by excessive American bombing. At the time it was considered "the most densely bombed area per capita on earth". It is now being thoroughly redeveloped, but large areas remain unusable because of the unexploded ordinances that yet have to be found and removed.

Phonsavan is the provincial capital and sits at an altitude of around 4000 feet. Population of the province is a little under 250,000 and is mostly Buddhist. The School is located in the Pek District which has a population of 75,000, living in 104 village communities. Twenty percent of this number live on less than 80 pence per day. There are 43,000 students studying in district schools. Feasibility studies indicate a large interest in the study of English.

The aim of the project is to establish an educational outreach centre in Xieng Khouang, through an English Language School. With this in mind, land was purchased and in June of 2014 a Laotian English teacher was posted there to start the school, with official certification to operate being granted early in 2015. Currently 130 students are enrolled and attend classes conducted in the living room and kitchen of the teacher's house. Fees are £2.50 per month and those who cannot afford even that are allowed to study free. Many are having to sit outside because the "classrooms" are overcrowded. A temporary outside classroom with a canvas sheet as a roof has been constructed, but this makeshift roof will not stand the heavy rain and wind of the monsoon season. Construction needs to start immediately on a solid classroom.

ADRA Laos is conducting nutrition seminars, cooking schools and hygiene seminars in northern Laos and has agreed to conduct their area programs from the school. Additionally a Korean NGO has invited the school to work with them in their community health programs in the area.

We propose contributing £6,000 for the construction of a classroom at the school.

£6,000
Namibia God Cares Center

The "God Cares Center" in Kongola operates preschool and primary school units (God Cares Primary School, registered with Ministry of Education, 20th of November, 2009, Code no. 8784). They provide social assistance to most underprivileged individuals (OVC, disabled persons, etc). All services are provided free of charge.

We propose contributing £1500 to purchase a new water tank and pump for some new dormitories they are building in December 2015.

£1,500
TOTAL £18,000

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2014 projects

We have posted these supporting documents for 2014.

Details

Amount GBP

Burkina Faso 'Excluded Women' project

A project run in conjunction with ADRA UK and a major commitment for CAP. The proposal is to fund for 3 years (2013-2015 inclusive) at £5000 pa. 2014 will be the second of the three years.

Update May 2015: see latest report...

See '2013', below for details.

£5,000
Egypt Sudanese school in Mataraiya, Cairo

We have funded two new classrooms over the last few years for the Sudanese refugee school in Cairo during which time enrollment has almost doubled. This year we will be funding a further classroom.

Update May 2015: The work is complete!

We have received this report from the school with costs for this and other projects. See also the reports for 2011 and 2012, below, for details of the school and our previous projects.

£3,000
Romania Care home in Ficko.

This project is similar to our first CAP 'ROPE' project, way back in 2006. A new elderly care home is being set up in the town of Ficko in Romania. CAP will be funding some basics for the new home, as follows:

  • 10 beds + mattresses
  • 10 beds side cabinets
  • 10 quilts + pillows
  • 20 bedding (sheet, quilt cover, pillowcase)
  • 20 towels
  • 20 mattress covers
  • 10 curtains

Update May 2015: see latest report...

£3,000
Gambia Basse Deaf School

In 2010 CAP made a small contribution to the work of KADECT, a charity set up to raise money for deaf children in Kashmir, Pakistan. This year we will be helping a related charity, 'The Gambian Deaf Children Support Project', in their efforts to build a school in The Gambia.

Plans and costings are available, along with the original formal request.

Update Oct 2015: see foundations...

Update May 2015: see latest report...

£3,000
Philippines Angeles City project

For the last three years we have worked with Dave Caukhill of ICC Australia on the 'Shining Jewels' children's home in the Philippines. This year we will be helping with a new venture that ICC Australia are starting - the 'Blessed Home' project in Angeles City, Philippines.

The project details make a grim read. Angeles City is estimated to be one of the largest 'sex tourism' destinations in the world. Blessed Home's main purpose is to provide a safe environment for the rehabilitation of girls who have been the victims of trafficking and sexual exploitation. Using counselling and psychological support, health and nutrition education, numeracy and literacy skills, vocational training and special empowerment classes, this project aims to give these girls the skills to reintegrate back into society and live happy lives. With some girls sadly still children, special classes that involve arts, crafts and games can also allow them to experience the enjoyment of childhood once more.

Update May 2015: see latest report...

£3,000
Scotland, Perth Perthshire Women's Aid (PWA)

PWA is a branch of Scottish Women’s Aid which provides practical assistance to victims of domestic abuse. PWA is a charity and receives some government grants to cover staff costs. Money for direct 'hands-on' aid to the women and children comes from donations such as this proposed CAP grant. PWA do not have a specific single project in mind. Our money would instead be spent on direct help, for example: clothing, food, basics needed for accommodation, translators for overseas clients and other necessities.

This will be the third year CAP has made contributions to the work of PWA.

£2,500
TOTAL £19,500

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2013 projects

We have posted these supporting documents for 2013.

Summary

Amounts  GBP

Carried forward from 2012: £2,449
Church Appropriation: £8,000
Funds Raised: £11,835
Total Income: £22,284
Total expenditure: £21,010
Carried forward to 2014: £1,274

Details

Amount GBP

Myanmar

Crieff Church has many links with ADRA, the ‘official’ aid/development branch of the Adventist Church. This project is run in conjunction with ADRA.

For most people in rural areas daylight is precious and when darkness comes access to artificial light is a challenge. The Waka Waka Solar Lamp uses high-tech sun boost technology to give 8 hours of bright ambient light and up to 80 hours of night safety illumination. All on a one-day solar charge. ADRA is currently working with Waka Waka Light of the Netherlands to purchase and deliver these lights to areas of need.

CAP worked with ADRA in Myanmar (Burma) to fund and deliver enough lights for a small village in the Pakokku region. Our £1000 bought 72 lights. These were delivered by hand by Tom Pignon of ADRA UK on his last visit to Myanmar.

Report with pictures...

£1,000
Burkina Faso

This the second of two projects run in conjunction with ADRA UK and is a major commitment for CAP. The proposal is to fund for 3 years (2013-2015 inclusive) at £5000 pa.

Burkina Faso, in West Africa, is one of the world’s poorest countries. Life is governed by poverty, ignorance and unquestioning acceptance of traditional beliefs as transmitted by traditional Chiefs. In the predominantly Mossi areas women are expelled from their villages following witchcraft accusations. These women are blamed following some inexplicable death in the village (a surge of meningitis, a fatal accident) and even after a medical report has established the true cause, the population continues to see witch-craft.

The women are expelled, stoned and beaten with clubs. Their houses and belongings are burnt and their husbands are forbidden to defend them. These illiterate women do not know their rights and find themselves alone and removed from their families and villages. In too many cases, women opt to commit suicide.

This project deals with the future of 75 such women expelled from their village and forbidden to see their families, living in Bousse in the Province of Kourweogo, in the Central Plateau region of Burkina Faso. Concrete actions will be taken so that the women can be socially re-integrated and participate in the economic life of their new community.

The project expressly targets their quality of life, providing training and enabling them to carry out income generation activities (market gardening, poultry rearing and preparation of soya "soumbala" (African mustard)). The project also targets advocacy to prevent the exclusion of other women, in particular from neighbouring villages.

A detailed breakdown of the project and costs can be found here.

£5,000
Egypt

Kitchen refurbishment at the Sudanese school in Mataraiya, Cairo

We have funded two new classrooms over the last few years for the Sudanese refugee school in Cairo and this year we were asked if we could assist in refurbishing the school kitchen.

See the reports for 2012, below, for details of the school.

£1,500
Egypt A 'Good Samaritan' fund to be administered by Llew Edwards to help with poor Egyptian families. £1,000
Lesotho

Sadly due to communication problems we were unable to continue funding this project. The £3000 we had allocated to this program was sent to the ADRA Appeal following the Philippines typhoon. See below.

n/a
Philippines In November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan wreaked havoc in the Philippines. ADRA UK responded very quickly to this event and began fund raising. Following the failure of the Maluti project we had £3000 left in the CAP account. More money was raised from the local church in response to the ADRA appeal and routed via CAP with the result that we were able to contribute £5039 to the ADRA Haiyan Appeal. £5,039
Philippines ICC project. This is the third and final year of this particular project. For details, see '2011', below. £5,000
Scotland, Perth A continuation of the project from 2012, see below.

Perthshire Women's Aid (PWA) is a branch of Scottish Women’s Aid which provides practical assistance to victims of domestic abuse. PWA is a charity and receives some government grants to cover staff costs. Money for direct 'hands-on' aid to the women and children comes from donations such as this proposed CAP grant. PWA do not have a specific single project in mind. Our money would instead be spent on direct help, for example: clothing, food, basics needed for accommodation, translators for overseas clients and other necessities.

£2,450
TOTAL £21,010

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2012 projects

We have posted these supporting documents for 2012.

Summary

Amounts  GBP

Carried forward from 2011: 1,587
Total funds raised: 17,975
Total expenditure: 17,117
Carried forward to 2013: 2,465

Details

Amounts Given, GBP

Egypt In 2010 CAP funded the construction of a new schoolroom at a school for Sudanese refugee children in Cairo. CAP propose that we fund an additional classroom at the same school to ease congestion in classes and increase the number of students. This will make a big difference to the income of the school and therefore salaries of the staff.

After the creation of the new nation of South Sudan there had been an expectation that the number of refugees in Egypt might have decreased. However the wars that are occurring in that area means that very few families actually do return. The less-than-ideal treatment of Sudanese refugees in Egypt makes the contribution of the school to the future of these children of vital importance for their future hopes and aspirations

The school is completely self funded by volunteers and what can be raised from school fees. A UN NGO administered by Catholic Relief Services gives about 100 EGP (£11) per registered refugee student. The school now has some 300 students of which 233 are registered refugees. Because the children come from poor households the fees are minimal – EGP 500 per year (£51). The school has 13 teachers.

4,000
Egypt A 'Good Samaritan' fund to be administered by Llew Edwards to help with poor Egyptian families. 1,000
Lesotho

This is a continuation of the long-standing support that CAP has offered to the 'Bana Ba Rona' Orphans and Vulnerable Children program at Maluti Adventist Hospital in Lesotho. Our contribution to this project is nonspecific and is intended to be used for non capital expenses. The proposed expenditure for 2012 is as follows:

Foster care: 12,000 ZAR £960*
Feeding scheme: 28,320 ZAR £2,260*
Infant formula: 7,200 ZAR £575*
Food packages: 15,080 ZAR £1205*
(* at 12.4ZAR/£)

Formerly known as the Crieff African Kids Enterprise project (see below)

5,000
Philippines A continuation of the project from 2011, see below. 5,000
Scotland, Perth Perthshire Women's Aid (PWA) is a branch of Scottish Women’s Aid which provides practical assistance to victims of domestic abuse. PWA is a charity and receives some government grants to cover staff costs. Money for direct 'hands-on' aid to the women and children comes from donations such as this proposed CAP grant. PWA do not have a specific single project in mind. Our money would instead be spent on direct help, for example: clothing, food, basics needed for accommodation, translators for overseas clients and other necessities. 2,000
EXPENSES Bank charges - to transfer money internationally costs money. Sadly. 117
TOTAL 17,117

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2011 projects

We have posted two supporting documents for 2011

Summary

Amounts  GBP

Carried forward from 2010: 12,025.28
Total funds raised: 12,614.00
Total expenditure: 23,052.00
Carried forward to 2012: 1,587.28

Details

Amounts Given, GBP

Egypt We are proposing to help in the renovation of a collapsing building that houses a kindergarten school in a village in Upper Egypt called Zuwak near the city of Sohag. This is currently a two room school, one room is completely derelict and unsafe, the other room is in use as a classroom. Update in 2012: The school renovation project stalled slightly. As you are no doubt aware 2011 was a turbulent year in Egypt. The school project is currently at the ‘planning’ stage and these things take time, particularly given the current uncertainty within the Egyptian political system. The money is being held, securely, by Llew Edwards and it is our intention to complete the project, hopefully in 2012/3. 3,000
Egypt A 'Good Samaritan' fund to be administered by Llew Edwards to help with poor Egyptian families. 2,000
Philippines in conjunction with ICC Australia. This project reaches out to the very impoverished tribal families in the Zambeles Mountains, an area inhabited by native Philippine tribes. They are typically subsistence farmers, very poor and lack access to education and health opportunities for their families. ICC has a centre in the foothills of this geographical region that has a school, clinic, expansive gardens (to be even more expanded) and a high care children’s home facility. This centre is called Shining Jewels.

The funds were allocated as follows:

Medical Support Native Family. Vitamins, milk, supplies, medicines £65
Educational assistance (42 children). Uniforms and clothing supplies, educational material, teachers salary £520
Microfinance loans ‘One Hope’ project £3,915
ICC Administration (10%) £500
5,000
Scotland, Perth Churches Action for the Homeless (CATH) is a progressive local charity which supports, encourages and promotes the development and delivery of projects to alleviate homelessness, poor and substandard housing and associated problems in the Perth and Kinross District. They help around 800 people a year to overcome homelessness issues through various projects including a drop in Day Centre, emergency hostel accommodation, tenancy support, outreach and Street work, literacy and numeracy support. The CAP funds would be put towards renovation of the CATH building. 2,000
Lesotho Carried over from 2010 This is a continuation of the long-standing support that CAP has offered to the Orphans and Vulnerable Children program at Maluti Adventist Hospital in Lesotho. Our contribution to this project is nonspecific and is intended to be used for non capital expenses. Currently we are effectively sponsoring a number of children at the local school. We also fund a system whereby volunteer families who take in AIDS orphans are given a stipend to help with the children's expenses. Clothes and/or food are supplied to non-fostered children who are living in family groups either with no adult, or a sick adult who is unable to pay for the upkeep of the children.
Formerly known as the Crieff African Kids Enterprise project (see below)
5,720
Romania An additional project was squeezed in during 2011. CAP paid for a tractor to be used at the Chesau Care Home (see the ROPE project below). This tractor was bought in the UK and delivered by a Crieff Church member. 5,300
TOTAL 23,000
EXPENSES Bank charges - to transfer money internationally costs money. Sadly. 52
TOTAL 23,052

* brought forward from the 2009 income, money transferred to Maluti in January 2011

At the end of 2010 we had collected a total of £19,559 which was well in excess of our initial budget. As a result we carried forward £6,305 to 2011.

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2010 projects

Summary

Amounts  GBP

Carried forward from 2009: 3,195.49
Total funds raised: 19,559.79
Total expenditure: (see note below about the Lesotho project) 10,730.00
Carried forward to 2011: 12,025.28

Details

Amounts Given, GBP

Egypt Enlargement of a school for children of Sudanese refugees in Cairo. 3,230
Egypt A 'Good Samaritan' fund to be administered by Llew Edwards to help with poor Egyptian families. 1,000
Pakistan Medical equipment for the only clinic for deaf children in Kashmir – operated by the Kashmir Deaf Children’s Trust (KADECT) 1,500
Albania Remodelling of an additional rural state school in Albania - with much of the work being undertaken by volunteers. The operation will be superintended by the experienced ADRA -Albania charity. 4,000
Lesotho Because the Crieff African Kids Enterprise (CAKE) is making such a huge difference in the lives of impoverished children, it is suggested that we continue to support this important programme. 5,720 (includes 3,195*)

* brought forward from the 2009 income. Update in 2011 - because of some uncertainty surrounding the future of this program when our contact retired from Maulti we held this money over until 2011 and it is included in the 2011 figures.

At the end of 2010 we had collected a total of £19,559 which was well in excess of our initial budget. As a result we carried forward £12,025 to 2011.

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2009 projects

Details

Amount Given, GBP

Kenya Equipment for Meru Hospital (coordinated by Dr Andrew Martin) 500
Kenya Community Services programme following civil unrest after the elections. 1,026
Albania Contribution towards the restoration of a village school at Rovel. 7,000
Romania Balance of funds brought forward from 2008 for the enhancement of a Care Home for the Aged at Chesau (aka the ROPE project) 1,000
Lesotho Continuation of project to assist scores of AIDS orphans (the (CAKE project). Amount transferred during 2009: 8,055
Amount carried forward to 2010 for CAKE: 3,195
TOTAL 20,776

From CAP chairman, John Arthur: On behalf of the CAP committee I would like to thank you most heartily for the way in which you helped in achieving our goals for 2009, when an amazing sum of £ 20,776 was raised. This was almost £ 8,000 in excess of the budget – which is even more commendable considering the impact of the recession.

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the rope project

The 'Romanian Old People's Enterprise'

Some of the text below is taken from the original Proposal in 2006.


1. SUMMARY

The ROPE project will help to answer the needs of the elderly and sick in the village of Chesau, Romania, who are not able to care for themselves. These people often have no family to care for them, have very little pension, or no pension at all. Instead of living in farm barns or on the streets, they will be provided with a comfortable home with all their needs cared for.

We are proposing providing a Crieff Aid Projects grant to this Home to cover the salaries of on or two qualified nurses, some running cots and some infrastructure costs. The grant will consist of

  • GBP 4000 from Church funds.
  • Any donations given specifically for this rope project.
  • Half of any donations given to the general CAP fund (the other half going to the cake project.

Section 3 gives a breakdown of the proposed spending.

2. BACKGROUND AND PROBLEM ANALYSIS

Chesau is a small village in Transylvania, Romania. Transylvania was part of Hungary until after the First World War when it was annexed to Romania. During the Second World War it again became part of Hungary for a while. The majority of the population in this area is Hungarian and follows the Hungarian traditions and speaks the native tongue, as well as the Romanian language.

In general, the whole country of Romania is very poor by European standards. Pensioners are particularly hard hit. The majority get a very small pension or no pension at all. Old people have to depend on their families and/or friends to help them with food. If an old person has no friends or family, then he/she is in great difficulty when it comes to the time that care is needed. There are very few nursing homes and those that do exist have enormous waiting lists. Medicine costs money, as does hospital treatment. There is a lot of work done for children throughout all these poor countries but the old and sick are very neglected. They do not arouse much emotion in donors and so charities always present a project for children so that they can obtain funds. However, old people still need love and care and that is in short supply. They have had a very difficult life living through the traumas of communism and in their old age they deserve a little comfort and love.

NEEDS IDENTIFIED

The above explains the needs of the elderly. However, the carers for these elderly people have problems in providing this necessary care. The main difficulty with running homes for the elderly is finance. Many of the old people do not have money to pay for their fees, yet they need suitable accommodation and care. How does one pay for a suitable building, equip it and then find money to pay for food, medical supplies, utility bills, and so on? It takes several years of support before a Home can be self-supporting.

3. THE PROJECT

The Home in Chesau was started 2 years ago by the Horvath family, consisting of father, mother, two sons and a daughter-in-law. They currently have 23 residents (update: as of August 2007 there are some 40 residents ) and are expanding as quickly as their resources permit.

The mother does all the cooking - 3 meals per day for 30 people. She has no help. The daughter-in-law cares for the residents along with 3 carers. The men folk are involved in the building of the property and all the maintenance, and everything else that needs to be done. The Home currently cares for 23 people, and as soon as a room is completed it is immediately occupied. There is still a waiting list. None of the Horvath family takes a salary as such, rather they live a subsistence living along with the residents of the Home.

This Chesau Home is in need of support. The family sold a lot of their belongings to start the Home. They have had to borrow money to help with the construction costs. They need equipment and furnishings for the rooms in the process of being built - e.g. lounge, dining room, kitchen, more bedrooms for residents. They also need a reliable vehicle.

(NOTE: the 2006 funds referred to in this original proposal have been spent as outlined in the 'ROPE Financial Statement for 2006'.)

CAP have no desire to micro-manage the Home - we see our roles as providing an easily verifiable project to our funders (ie Crieff Church), and removing major expenses from our fundees.

WHY DO WE HAVE CONFIDENCE IN THIS FAMILY?

References have been received for the Horvath family. The 2-year history of the Home proves their dedication to their cause. They have willingly sacrificed money and time. They have worked many years in the Cluj Home and made no secret of the fact that one day they would like to run a Home of their own. There exists an excellent relationship between the Cluj personnel and the Horvath family. The doctor that works voluntarily in Cluj also visits the Chesau residents once a week on a voluntary basis. The Horvath's decision to run a Home was not a spur of the moment un-thought out action.

MONITORING

Mrs Margit Szalos-Farkas who is known to many members in Crieff is willing to monitor the project. Monitoring will be done in accordance with CAP's wishes on advice from those in Crieff who know the situation.

RISK ASSESSMENT

We do not envisage any risks with this project, as a reliable person in Romania will monitor it. Two people from Crieff regularly visit Romania and would be able to take out funding, thus saving bank charges, and check everything is working as planned. Government instability in the future in any of these countries is something over which we have no control.

SUSTAINABILITY

It is envisaged that in a few years' time this Home will be self-supporting as they take in more patients who are able to pay fees and the construction work is completed.

4. CONCLUSION

That the Crieff Adventist Church, via the CAP fund, undertake to provide a minimum grant of GBP4000 pa for period of three years to be allocated by the OVC Project.

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the cake project

The 'Crieff African Kids Enterprise'

The text below is taken from the original Proposal in 2006.


1. SUMMARY

The CAKE project will help to provide assistance to the existing Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) project at Maluti Adventist Hospital in Lesotho, a land-locked country surrounded by South Africa.

We are providing a Crieff Aid Projects (CAP) grant to the OVC Project to cover basic food and education for a number of children and/or a salary and travel costs for a worker to help in documenting the local needs. The grant will consist of

  • GBP 4000 from Church funds.
  • Any donations given specifically for this cake project.
  • Half of any donations given to the general CAP fund (the other half going to the rope project.

Section 3 gives a breakdown of the proposed spending.

2. BACKGROUND AND PROBLEM ANALYSIS

Maluti Adventist Hospital (MAH) was established in 1951 near the border of a small, land locked, independent country within South Africa. Today this country is known as Lesotho. MAH is the second busiest hospital in the country, and is the hospital of choice (because of the Christian care available) for much of the population of this mountainous region. Its primary purpose is to provide health care to the approximately 100,000 people in the local area (one of the 9 Health Service Areas (HSA) of Lesotho). This is a sprawling hilly/mountainous area with many small settlements and larger villages. The roads are rough and hard on vehicles, and the people are mostly subsistence farmers, sowing small crops and keeping small herds of cattle, sheep and goats. Poverty is the norm.

NEEDS IDENTIFIED

Life in Lesotho has always been hard but AIDS has made everything far more difficult - and no family is unaffected by it. The extended family where children grew up as one big happy family, mothered by several aunts as well as mother, and grandparents could relax in the sun knowing they were cared for by their children, is a thing of the past. Instead, elderly parents bury their children and are left to take care of their offspring, or the eldest children suddenly find themselves the head of the household with all the responsibility of adulthood and very few of the skills and resources. There are an estimated 4700 orphans in the area served by MAH. About 600 live in close proximity to the hospital, the others are scattered throughout the wider area. This is a huge and tragic problem.

"With a per capita income of US$ 520 in 2000, Lesotho is among the 49 Least Developed Countries and is ranked 91st on the UNDP Human Poverty Index Scale. Lesotho has scarce natural resources and is dependent on South Africa for employment opportunities. With a population of 2.2 million and 320,000 of its adults estimated to be living with HIV, the country is facing a national meltdown. The pandemic is reversing the progress made in human development and poverty alleviation over the past decades and threatening the productive sectors of the economy, delivery of social services and the entire social fabric. The orphan population is estimated at one-third of the children under 14 years (ranging from 73,000 to 100,000 according to sources). The recent scrapping of the textile quota system has exposed national producers to Asian competition and worsened the economic situation."
World Health Organisation ~ http://www.who.int/hac/crises/lso/en/

The Hospital has been looking after an increasing number of orphans and other vulnerable children as the AIDS pandemic worsened. Recently they have set up a formal OVC project. The objectives of this OVC project have been clearly stated by the organisers:

  1. To provide life's basics for OVCs, i.e. food, shelter, clothing, medical care and social support.
  2. To provide assessments and data to support the above.
  3. To work with existing carers, e.g. relatives, NGOs already involved in the MAH HAS, church and village support groups.
  4. To provide shelters for orphaned and abandoned babies and toddlers where no other alternative exists.
  5. To help the OVCs to help themselves through agricultural programmes, crafts, wood chopping and sale, etc.
  6. To provide a study and service centre near the hospital as a place where those OVCs of high school age can study after school, learn skills, have recreation, and receive counselling as needed.

They emphasise the importance of keeping the OVCs in their local communities. Where possible it is always preferable to provide assistance in-situ because of the way in which local land ownership works in the tribal system.

3. THE PROJECT

The OVC Project has recently been 'spun off' from the main work of the Maluti Adventist Hospital and has just taken on a fund-raiser with specific responsibility for the OVCs. They clearly expressed two wishes to us.

  • To fund a salary and transport costs for a local worker to travel the area and assess the needs. The people of Lesotho are a strong, independent people (see Lyn Hurlow's letter, Section 5) and it is often difficult to assess the scale of a person's need and a full time worker would assist greatly in this essential task.
  • Simple food and education for as many children as possible.

We propose that CAP grant the sum of GBP4000pa to fund a salary and travel expenses for a needs-assessment worker and/or food and education for a number of children. We would take guidance on which requirement is the most urgent from the OVC Project as and when funds become available.

As with all AIDS related work in Africa the OVC Project is a financial black hole. The amount of money required to fully fund the feeding, education and health of the orphans is much greater than anything the Crieff Adventist Church can muster. However the imperative to try remains with us. The OVC Project has been up and running for some time in an informal capacity but the scale of the problem has overwhelmed them - hence the creation of a formal OVC department within the Hospital. They know the needs much better than we can ever hope to so we must accept their decision as to the best way to spend the money.

WHY DO WE HAVE CONFIDENCE IN THE OVC PROJECT?

The Director of the Maluti Adventist Hospital, Dr Wil Hurlow, is known personally to a number of people in our church. His wife, Lyn, has been involved with the informal and formal OVC project. The fundraiser, Heather Tredoux, is again known personally to a number of Crieff members and prior to taking up this post was involved in the South African VOP for many years. The Hospital has been serving the local community for over 50 years.

In addition the MAH has received help in the past from various 'blue chip' funders such as the Alumni Association of the School of Medicine at Loma Linda University, Save the Children (UK), Bristol Myers, Ireland Aid and the World Food Program .

MONITORING

Lyn Hurlow and Heater Tredoux would provide feedback and reporting to us. Monitoring will be done in accordance with CAP's wishes.

RISK ASSESSMENT

Lesotho is a relatively stable country politically. It is fully surrounded by South Africa, a stable country with good transport and financial links with the West. By African standards it will be easy to reliably get funds to the hospital.

SUSTAINABILITY

The AIDS pandemic is destroying Africa. There is currently no prospect of this project ever becoming self-supporting and it would be foolish to expect otherwise. As Lyn Hurlow eloquently put it "I don't think anybody was prepared for the impact AIDS has had on societies in Africa, and now its a bit like standing in a flooded river trying to grab at people as they go rushing past. But at the same time we do believe the tide can be stemmed, and people are being helped."

FUTURE OPTIONS

Basic funding will always be required and they could use any amount of money we could raise. We have not explored the possibility of sending out a group of workers to assist in building etc.

4. CONCLUSION

That the Crieff Adventist Church, via the CAP fund, undertake to provide a minimum grant of GBP4000 pa for period of three years to be allocated by the OVC Project.

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History

In 2005 the G8 circus came to Auchterarder, just across the valley from Crieff. To mark the occasion a broad coalition of groups came together to form the 'Make Poverty History' campaign and later Mr Geldof launched the Live 8 concerts. If you were in the UK at the time you will remember the huge public support for both. We realised that our small town was going to be very close to the epicentre of these events so we teamed up with the local Church of Scotland to make sure that any passing G8 person would be quite clear what our sleepy Scottish town felt about the disgrace that is third world poverty.

St Andrew's tower The tall St Andrews steeple can be seen for miles around and, taking our lead from the white 'MAKEPOVERTYHISTORY' wristbands that everyone seemed to be wearing, we erected a 'steeple band'. Soon the town was full of posters and banners (see the Crieff MAKEPOVERTYHISTORY web site for many more pictures). St Andrew's tower The final event of 'Make Poverty History', a rally in Edinburgh on July 2nd, was the biggest single gathering of people in Scotland for any purpose, ever. The people had spoken.

However the terrorist bombings in London on the 7th of July diverted the attention of the world from the events of the previous week and I'm not sure it's clear, even today, what the long term effects of that G8 summit were. That said, a year later 'Saint' Bob Geldof declared the event a limited success. Maybe that is the best we can expect.

After the G8 summit left town our small church was looking around for something else to get our teeth into. We talked and thought and prayed and eventually decided that maybe we could find some small-ish project that we could maybe adopt and maybe do something useful. Lots of 'maybes'.

In the best tradition of churches everywhere we then set up a committee. However our church has a number of folks who actually know something about the world outside. Our committee had

  • an ex-African missionary,
  • someone who used to run a charity taking aid to former Eastern bloc countries,
  • a long term ADRA volunteer who had just come back from a stint in Sri Lanka following the tsunami,
  • some practical folks who had been involved in building projects in Romania.

In early 2006 we started to search for a project with a very tentative budget of GBP 4000. There was consultation with ADRA leaders and other aid organizations and working with the church board to set up the criteria as well as accountability guidelines for a project. After literally hundreds of pages of possible projects, the committee came up not with one but two projects that seemed ideally suited to its objectives.

The first was to support an Old People's Home, in Chesau, Romania. The family running the home were struggling to care for their 23 residents (note, as of Aug 2007 there were nearly 40 residents). The home had been in existence for some years and struggled to meet the needs of its poor community. Here was a need that the committee felt we could directly address. Thus was born the 'ROPE' project.

The second was to assist orphans and vulnerable children at Maluti Adventist Hospital in Lesotho. Maluti is a comparatively large Adventist hospital in a relatively stable but very poor country with an enormous AIDS problem. Children orphaned by AIDS began simply turning up at the hospital seeking food. Staff soon realized that they had literally hundreds of AIDS orphans needing food, clothing and schooling assistance right on their doorstep. This became the 'CAKE' project.

Problem - which one should be help? We were able to establish good lines of accountability in both projects through people known personally to members of the committee. Both needs cried out and tore at our heartstrings.

Solution - take the choice to the Church Board and then the Business meeting. The Business Meeting was convened on Sunday 18th June 2006 and made the marvelous decision to set aside a further GBP 4000 making a total of GBP 8000 to assist both projects. We also decided that to appeal to our wider Church family and community (and if you're still reading this that means you...) to donate to and increase the funds available to help in these projects.

So, as of June 2006, we had committed ourselves to spending GBP 8000 per year for 3 years from Church funds. Plus whatever we could raise by any other means.

Conclusions? It's trite to say that this project has fired up our church. That isn't why we did it. Even if CAP makes our congregation excessively miserable we still NEED to do it. It's not about us. We don't matter. But we are going to be trite anyway. The project has fired up our church and it has done us a power of good. Must be one of those 'win-win' things....